Muhammad Ziyad Md Tah (@7.5) vs Yupeng Bai (@1.06)
10-09-2019

Our Prediction:

Yupeng Bai will win

Muhammad Ziyad Md Tah – Yupeng Bai Match Prediction | 10-09-2019 00:35

In his Usul, al-Kafi writes, "When the caliph got news of Imam Hasan 'Askari's illness, he instructed his agents to keep a constant watch over the house of the Imam...he sent some of these midwives to examine the slave girls of the Imam to determine if they were pregnant. Genealogy trees of Middle Eastern and Central Asian families, mostly from Persia, Khorasan, Samarqand and Bukhara show that Imam Hasan al-Askari had also a second son called Sayyid Ali Akbar,[53][54] however, his existence is rejected by Shiite historians. The reason, why the fact that Imam Al-Askari had children or not is until today disputed was maybe because of the political conflicts between the followers of the Imamah and the leadership of the Abbasids and Ghulat Shiites who had not believe Hasan al-Askaris Imamah. Twelver Shias say his birth was concealed. Others argue that even if he had a son, Muhammad ibn al-Hassan could not live for over a thousand years.[36][50][51][52] The existence of any descendant of Al-Askari is disputed by many people. However it is believed by Twelver Shi'ites and some Sunnis that Al-Askari had a son who would be the redeemer of Islam. It definitely indicates that Imam al-Askari had children and it also substantiates the existence of the Imam. Notable descendants of Sayyid Ali Akbar are Sufi Saints like Bahauddin Naqshband,[55][56] descendant after 11 generations,[57]Khwaja Khawand Mahmud known as Hazrat Ishaan, descendant after 18 generations and Sayyid ul Sadaat Sayyid Mir Jan, maternal descendant of Imam Hasan al Askari and Hazrat Ishaan.[58] In her book "Pain and Grace: A Study of Two Mystical Writers of Eighteenth-Century Muslim India" p.32, Dr.Annemarie Schimmel writes:"Khwaja Mir Dard`s family, like many nobles, from Bukhara; led their pedigree back to Baha'uddin Naqshband, after whom the Naqshbandi order is named, and who was a descendant, in the 11th generation of the 11th Shia imam al-Hasan al-Askari."Although Shiite historians generally reject the claim Hasan al-Askari fathered children other than Muhammad al-Mahdi, the Shiite hadith book Usul al-Kafi, in Bab Mawlid Abi Muhammad al-Hasan b.'Ali confirms the Sufi claim that Hasan al-Askari had more than one wife, in addition to slave girls, with whom he had relations.

Henry Corbin in contrast believed that the question of historicity is irrelevant admitting that the idea of the hidden Imam was shaped by the person of twelfth and considering the extensive body of literature about him, saw the birth and his occultation as archetypal and symbolic, describing it as "sacred history".

Twelver Shi'as cite various references from the Qur'an and reports, or Hadith, from Imam Mahdi and the Twelve Imams with regard to the reappearance of al-Mahdi who would, in accordance with Allah's command, bring justice and peace to the world by establishing Islam throughout the world. Shia'as also believe that Imam Mahdi will reappear on a Friday, and that he will come forth speaking Arabic (probably all languages as he has Allah as translator). Shi'as believe that `s (Jesus) will also come (after Imam Mahdi's re-appearance) and follow the Imam to destroy tyranny and falsehood and to bring justice and peace to the world.[32] This will also be accompanied by the raj'a (return) of several other personalities for retribution of the previously oppressed against the oppressor.

Locations

`Abdu'l-Bah has interpreted the Book of Revelation 11:3 "And I will give power to my two witnesses, and they will prophesy one thousand two hundred and sixty days, clothed in sackcloth."[62][63] The two witnesses are Muhammad and Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib.

Shias generally believe that in every age, there is an Imam, either apparent or hidden.

According to the Shia, the Mahdi belongs to Muhammad's Bayt (Household), being a descendant of Ali, Fatimah and Ali ibn Husayn Zayn al-Abidin, and considered by Twelvers to be the son of Al-Askari, and consequently the twelfth Imam of the Twelve Imams of the Bayt.

Hadith about twelve Imams). According to Jassim M. Hussain, the majority of the Imamites denied his birth or even his existence, and abandoned their belief in the hidden Imam except for a small minority belonging to the circles of narrators, like Ibn Qubba and al-Nu'mani who based their belief on the traditions of the Imams (i.e.

See also[edit]

Examples of this include the cases of Muhammad ibn al-Hanafiyyah (according to the Kaysanites Shia), Muhammad ibn Abdallah An-Nafs Az-Zakiyya, Musa al-Kadhim (according to the Waqifite Shia), Muhammad ibn Qasim (al-Alawi), Yahya ibn Umar and Muhammad ibn Ali al-Hadi (according to the Muhammadite Shia). Some scholars, including Bernard Lewis[40] also point out, that the idea of an Imam in occultation was not new in 873 CE but that it was a recurring factor in Shia history.

On 3 May 2017, the then-Saudi deputy crown prince Mohammad bin Salman Al Saud, in an interview with MBC made repeated references to the Shi'ite ideology of the Iranian state to reject the possibility of dialogue with Iran for settling the regional rivalry between the two countries.

It also acted as a moderating force among them by postponing political activities until the future coming of the Awaited Mahdi.[66] The belief has also acted as an inspiration for social movements against political repression. The messianic belief in Mahdi helped Shias to tolerate unbearable situations to the level that without it the Shia religion might not have been able to survive persecutions in the course of history.

Hasan al-Askari's estate was divided between his brother Jafar and his mother.

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Another instance of contemporary Shia messianic tendency manifested itself in the discourse and policies of the former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad who thought that Mahdi's return was imminent.