Loughgall (@1.57) vs H & W Welders (@4.1)
05-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Loughgall will win

Loughgall – H & W Welders Match Prediction | 05-10-2019 10:00

The shotgun drew the attention of the Garda since the same type of weapon was used in three recent murders in the area. If the roles were reversed we would let you go back. We are all doing the one bloody job", but he eventually ordered his men to surrender their weapons after Irish Army soldiers surrounded both cars and aimed rifles at them.[10] The Garda unit, commanded by Sergeant Pat McLoughlin, radioed his superiors for instructions on how to deal with the men now in custody. Rees and Nicholson were still wearing British Army uniforms. When the soldiers manning the surveillance post failed to meet Ligari and Lawson, they radioed their base at Bessbrook Mill. The Omeath Garda station was ordered to keep the men in custody until a decision was taken at a Governmental level in Dublin. The second cara Vauxhall Victor with Burchell and Rhodeswas stopped shortly after. Initially, an IRA ambush was suspected. Four plain-clothes SAS soldierstroopers Nial McClean, Vincent Thompson, Nigel Burchell and Carsten Rhodeswere sent to search for their missing comrades in two cars, picking up the two men from the observation post in the process.[10] The team was carrying another three Sterling submachine-guns, a Remington pump-action shotgun and 222 rounds of ammunition.[12] The first vehicle a Hillman Avenger carrying Thompson, McClean, Rees and Nicholson - drove up to the Garda checkpoint at 2:05 am. Sergeant Rees tried to explain the situation to the Garda: "Let us go back.

Major George Shaw, a 57-year-old father of two, worked full-time for the MOD and was a part-time soldier. Early in the morning as he prepared to drive to work, two masked PIRA gunmen who had been hiding behind trees walked over and shot him three times in the head, mortally wounding him. 26 January 1987: Senior UDR officer was killed outside his home on Coalisland Road, Dungannon. Almost immediately another part-time soldier chanced upon the scene and opened fire on the fleeing gunmen who managed to escape by forcing a passing car to stop and raced off. Major Shaw died at the scene.

They were armed and wearing bulletproof vests, boilersuits, gloves and balaclavas.[3] The digger drove past the police station, turned around and drove back again with the Toyota van carrying the main IRA assault party doing the same.[20] Not seeing any activity in the station in their two slow passes of it, members of the IRA unit felt that something was amiss,[20] and debated whether to continue, but decided to go ahead with the attack.[18] Tony Gormley and Gerard O'Callaghan got out of the van and joined Declan Arthurs on the digger, according to journalist Peter Taylor, "literally riding shotgun", with weapons in one hand and a lighter in the other.[20] At about 7:15 Arthurs drove the digger towards the station.[3] In the front bucket was 200400 lb[19] of semtex inside an oil drum, partially hidden by rubble and wired to two 40-second fuses.[16] The other five members of the unit followed in the van with Eugene Kelly driving, unit commander Patrick Kelly in the passenger seat, whilst in the rear were Lynagh, Pdraig McKearney, and Seamus Donnelly.[20] The digger crashed through the light security fence and the fuses were lit. The IRA unit arrived in Loughgall from the north-east shortly after 7PM,[3] when the station was scheduled to close for the night.

The Volunteers killed at Loughgall were Declan Arthurs (21), Tony Gormley (24), Eugene Kelly (25), Pdraig McKearney (32), Jim Lynagh (31), Gerard O'Callaghan (28), Seamus Donnelly (19) and unit commander Patrick Joseph Kelly (30). This was the IRA's greatest loss of life in a single incident since the days of the Anglo-Irish War (19191922). On 8 May 1987, at least eight members of the brigade launched another attack on the unmanned Loughgall RUC base. However, as their attack was underway, the IRA unit was ambushed by a Special Air Service (SAS) unit. The SAS shot dead eight IRA members and a civilian who had accidentally driven into the ambush. Six IRA members from a supporting unit managed to escape. The IRA unit used the same tactics as it had done in The Birches attack.[10][11] It destroyed a substantial part of the base with a 200lb bomb and raked the building with gunfire.

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The SAS ambush had no noticeable long-term effect on the level of IRA activity in East Tyrone. Ed Moloney, Irish journalist and author of the Secret History of the IRA, states that the Provisional IRA East Tyrone Brigade lost 53 members killed in the Troubles, the highest of any rural Brigade area. The level of IRA activity in the area did not show any real decline in the aftermath: in the two years prior to the Loughgall ambush the IRA killed seven people in East Tyrone and North Armagh, and eleven in the two years following the ambush.[16] Additionally, most of the attacks which took place in County Fermanagh during this period of the Troubles were also launched from south Tyrone and Monaghan.[17] However, many of their remaining activists were young and inexperienced and fell into further ambushes, leading to high casualties by the standards of the low intensity guerrilla conflict in Northern Ireland.

The emphasis, indeed, is very much on family pursuits. Loughgall Country Park is a rural haven of relaxation and recreation. A diverse spectrum of activities ranging from golf to walking, fishing to tennis make this spacious complex a mecca for families, sports enthusiasts and those merely in search of a helping of tranquility. Walking, cycling, a childrens play area, golf, fishing, an adventure trail, trim trail, football pitch and tennis courts are just some of the amenities on offer.

The first high-profile action carried out by the SAS in 1976 was in March when it abducted Sean McKenna, an IRA member wanted for attempted murder and a string of other offences. McKenna was abducted at 2:30 am while sleeping at home in Edentober, on the Republic's side of the border, in a cross-border raid by the SAS. Once across the border, he was officially arrested by another detachment of the British Army.

From mid-1992 up to the 1994 cease fire, IRA units in east and south Tyrone carried out eight mortar attacks against police and military facilities and were also responsible for at least 16 bombings and shootings.

The security forces recovered eight IRA firearms from the scene: three H&K G3 rifles, one FN FAL rifle, two FN FNC rifles, a Franchi SPAS-12T shotgun and a Ruger Security-Six revolver.

The second was an attack on an RUC base at The Birches on 11 August 1986. Members of the unit, such as Jim Lynagh and Pdraig McKearney, advocated a strategy of destroying bases and preventing them being rebuilt or repaired in an attempt to "deny ground" to British forces.[10][11] In 1985, Patrick Joseph Kelly became its commander and began implementing the strategy. In both attacks, the bases were raked with machine-gun fire and then severely damaged with homemade bombs. In 1985 and 1986, it carried out two major attacks on Royal Ulster Constabulary bases.[12] The first was an attack on the RUC barracks in Ballygawley on 7 December 1985, in which two police officers were shot dead. By the mid-1980s it had become one of the IRA's most aggressive formations. The IRA's East Tyrone Brigade was active mainly in eastern County Tyrone and neighbouring parts of County Armagh.

A Garda Sochna officer stated that the bridge was at least half in the Republic, and the British Army officer on the scene disputed this. The Irish Army then deployed a unit of soldiers and its commander, armed with a submachine gun, demanded that the British Army surrender their explosives. A British patrol was laying explosive charges to destroy the bridge, as part of an effort to destroy bridges and roads being used by the Provisional IRA to import arms and supplies from the Republic of Ireland into Northern Ireland. On 28 October 1971, a confrontation took place between British and Irish troops at a cross-border bridge between the Republic and Northern Ireland, at the village of Munnelly, between counties Fermanagh and Monaghan.

SAS operations against the IRA also continued. The East Tyrone Brigade continued to be active until the last Provisional IRA ceasefire ten years later.