Grange (@1.62) vs Shane O'Neills (@2.63)
06-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Grange will win

Grange – Shane O'Neills Match Prediction | 06-10-2019 11:00

Although the O'Neill had allied himself against the English with the Scottish MacDonnell clan, who had settled in Antrim, Queen Elizabeth I, on succeeding to the English throne in 1558, was inclined to come to terms with the O'Neill, who after his father's death functioned as de facto head of the dynasty. O'Neill refused to put himself in the power of Sussex without a guarantee for his safety; and so Elizabeth decided to establish Brian in his place. She accordingly agreed to recognise his claims to the lordship, throwing over Brian O'Neill, son of the assassinated Feardorcha, Baron of Dungannon, if the O'Neill would submit to her authority and that of her deputy.

Arthur and Dan Gibson went on to represent County Antrim. It is situated in the outskirts of Glenarm village in Feystown and has over 100 members. Antrim GAA has a Gaelic football club named in his honour, Shane O'Neill's GFC, founded by the solicitor and antiquarian Francis Joseph Bigger. Shane O'Neill's hurling club was the first official GAA club in Glenarm, founded in 1903 using land donated by the Gibson family of the Libbert, Glenarm. There is also a Shane O'Neill's GAC in Camloch, County Armagh.

The name "Shane" is an anglicisation of the Gaelic name "Sen" (John). Shane's name is given in the Annals of the Four Masters (at M1567.2) as "Sean mac Cuinn, mic Cuinn mic Enri, mic Eocchain" ("John son of Conn, son of Conn, son of Henry, son of Eoin")[1] Elsewhere in the Annals (e.g. at M1552.7) he is referred to as "Sean Donngaileach Neill".[2] This refers to the fact that as a youth he was fostered by his cousins, the O'Donnelly Clan, of which the Chief was Marshal of the O'Neill forces.[3] This was rendered as anglicisations such as "Donnolloh" in contemporary manuscripts,[4] and as "John, or Shane Doulenagh O'Neil" in Abb MacGeoghegan's 1758 History of Ireland.[5] After he assumed the leadership of the O'Neills, he was referred to simply as " Nill" ("The O'Neill").

The O'Neill ravaged the Pale, failed in an attempt on Dundalk, made a truce with the MacDonnells, and sought help from the Earl of Desmond. The English invaded Donegal and restored O'Donnell. This victory greatly strengthened Shane O'Neill's position, and Sir Henry Sidney, who became lord deputy in 1565, declared to the earl of Leicester that "Lucifer himself was not more puffed up with pride and ambition than O'Neill".

Learn More in these related Britannica articles:

During this visit Shane's legal claim to his father Conn Bacach's earldom was verbally confirmed and Shane was led to believe that he would be recognised as the 2nd Earl of Tyrone, though some reservation was made of the possible future rights of Hugh O'Neill, who had succeeded his brother Brian as Baron of Dungannon. However, confirmation of the grant of the earldom was never delivered, and the O'Neill was compelled to defend his hegemony in Ulster when his onetime supporter Sir Henry Sidney was appointed Lord Deputy and resurrected Sussex's policy of undermining the O'Neill's authority. Brian had been killed in a skirmish in April 1562 by Shane's Tanaiste, Turlough Luineach O'Neill.

Elizabeth, whose prudence and parsimony were averse to so formidable an undertaking as the complete subjugation of the powerful O'Neill, desired peace with him at almost any price. An attempt by Sussex to increase the enmity of the O'Donnells against the O'Neill was frustrated by his seizure of Calvagh O'Donnell in a monastery. Elizabeth's faith in Sussex's aggressive strategy diminished when the repeated annual devastations of O'Neill's territory by the Lord Deputy with sizeable and expensive armies failed to bring him to submission.

Shane was born in or just before 1530, to Conn Bacach O'Neill, chief of the O'Neills of Tyrone, and Sorcha O'Neill, daughter of Hugh Oge O'Neill, chief of the O'Neills of Clandeboye.[3] Shane's mother died while he was very young and Shane, following Gaelic custom, was fostered by the O'Donnelly family, who raised him until adulthood.

The O'Neill offered some concessions, most significantly consenting to present himself before Elizabeth in London to argue his case against Sussex and the Baron of Dungannon in person. Elizabeth consented to treat, and hostilities ceased on terms that gave the O'Neill practically all his demands. The O'Neill requested the hand of Sussex's half-sister Lady Frances Radclyffe in marriage as an earnest of future friendship. Accompanied by the Earls of Ormonde and Kildare as surety for his safety, the O'Neill reached London on 4 January 1562. William Camden describes the wonder which his gallowglasses occasioned in the English capital, with their heads bare, their long hair falling over their shoulders and clipped short in front above the eyes, and clothed in saffron-dyed shirts of fine linen.

Intermediate Football Championship Groups & Fixtures

Marching north at unprecedented speed, the O'Neill surprised the MacDonnells, who had expected him to intervene against an incursion by James MacDonnell of Dunnyveg's own household troops who had landed in Lecale. In turning his hand against the MacDonnells, Shane O'Neill claimed that he was serving the Queen of England in harrying the Scots. While James MacDonnell of Dunnyveg and his brothers rapidly assembled an army in Scotland, the O'Neill defeated Sorley Boy MacDonnell's local levies at Knockboy above Broughshane, crossed the Antrim mountains by way of Clogh and after burning James's new castle at Redbay, pursued the remains of Sorley's army and the recently landed army under James to the neighbourhood of Ballycastle, where he routed the MacDonnells at the Battle of Glentasie and took Sorley's and his badly wounded brother James prisoner. He fought an indecisive battle with Sorley Boy MacDonnell near Coleraine in 1564, and the following Easter hosted his entire army at Feadan above Newry.